A Word About Wreaths

The holiday season has long been a time for decorating. We deck the halls with boughs of holly and hang each stocking by the chimney with care. Lights are strung on each tree branch and a festive ring of pine greets carolers at the door. Take a look at some examples of wreaths that are creative […]

Philadelphia Flower Show

For the past several years the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society has invited me to participate at their “Designer’s Studio”. This stage is set for demonstrations and fun floral design competitions similar to that of “Iron Chef”. Three designers receive the same material and create a design using their skill and imagination. A master of ceremonies interacts with the audience and the panel of designers. He introduces the designers and explains the techniques and principles of design throughout the competition. The public determines a winner by voting for their favorite design on a smart phone app. We all know that technology can be temperamental so the applause meter is employed as a stand by judge.

This set of photos illustrates some designs that I created for a demonstration. Some designs are colorful and whimsical while others are more natural and organic. Some designs include colorful plastic straws, wool and yarn and beaded wire. Other designs incorporate more natural elements such as birch bark, moss and curly willow branches. Each design exhibits a strong color harmony that is striking and unique.

This set of pictures illustrate a blue ribbon winner. Here I used some floral material with unexpected design application and technique. I stripped the rose stems of all its foliage and saved the thorny stems. I added the stems in a group to create a strong horizontal line. Most of the flowers are arranged in groups to add dominate visual impact. I curled some strips of textured flat wire and inserted them in such a way that the eye will travel up the design and fall in the center focal area. Rhinestone pins are inserted into the center of the rose blooms to accentuate the shiny metallic surface of the glass urn and the curled wire.